The Smallest Sunflower – Part II

smallest sunflower

The smallest sunflower blooms! As stated in my previous article, I am sharing the picture of this small sunflower as it reaches maturity. This species of sunflower is 7-8 inches in height.

tiny sunflower
Small sunflower 7 – 8 inches

The small sunflower variety in this picture was a surprise in the garden! Quite frankly, this tiny sunflower has a sturdy, thick stem and looks healthier than my 5 foot sunflower.

sunflower head
the bud of a young sunflower

This flower is thriving under a sparsely shaded area of our Chilean Mesquite canopy. The lightly shaded location may be why my smallest sunflower is able to withstand this month’s 110 degree weather here in The Arizona Sonoran Desert.

The largest family of flowering plants is the ubiquitous sunflower familycontaining nearly 1550 genera and 24,000 species, according to James L. Reveal of the University of Maryland.

You are most likely familiar with common names such as marigolds, zinnias, daisies, dandelions, sagebrush, and chrysanthemums that all belong to the Sunflower family, Asteraceae.

tiny sunflower
smallest sunflower

If this tiny sunflower species provides me with seeds to harvest,  it will mean a small sunflower garden for spring!

Sunflower in Greek – helios means sun – anthos means flowerHelianthus is the genus for Sunflowers. The flower is actually a head of flowers crowded together. The outer flowers are the ray florets and can be orange, yellow or maroon. The flowers that fill the circular head inside the ray flowers are called disc florets.

sunflowers in containers
Dwarf Sunflowers in pots

Dwarf Sunflowers are a good choice for growing in a pot, window or porch box.   Remembering to thin out the weaker ones early on.  GOOD GROWING TIPS

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Author: tjsgarden

We are a family that loves the Arizona Desert. A lot of research and team efforts go into our articles and photos. Come discover the beauty and mystery with us. Don't forget your sunscreen!

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